How The Rise Of Social Apps Changed The Gen-Y View On Plastic Surgery

5 Jun 2015

How The Rise Of Social Apps Changed The Gen-Y View On Plastic Surgery

Social Apps changed the Gen-Y view on Plastic Surgery as their views are drastically different from the generations before them. For example, even men are jumping on the bandwagon with more and more “Brotox” requests (Botox for men) and liquid rhinoplasty and facelifts.

According to recent reports from The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, various procedures among male patients seeking fillers and other enhancing hydraulics have skyrocketed up to 43 percent in a short five-year period.

Who Is Generation Y?

Generation Y, also known as Millennials, refers to the demographic cohort born between the early 1980s and mid-1990s. This generation witnessed rapid advancements in technology and grew up with access to computers, the internet, and mobile phones. Generation Y is often characterized by their adaptability and comfort with digital platforms. They were the first ones to fully embrace social media networks like Facebook and Twitter, which greatly influenced their communication style. Raised during a time of economic growth but also facing financial challenges such as student loan debt and job market instability, this generation tends to value experiences over material possessions. Generation Y has been applauded for their entrepreneurial spirit and desire for work-life balance while seeking meaningful careers that align with their values. With an increased emphasis on diversity and inclusion, this cohort tends to be more accepting of different cultures, identities, and lifestyles compared to previous generations. The influence of globalization has shaped them into a globally connected group that appreciates multiculturalism in all aspects of life.

Social Apps Changed The Gen-Y View On Plastic Surgery

Many surgeons (and media articles) are attributing this rise to the increased usage of social media platforms. This only further proves the issue is a social media fallout, not a gender-specific disorder.

Internet transformations are a part of our daily feeds, and people can continually take their looks to the next level with these filtered makeovers.

The current trend is blurring the lines between the real and the fake and stirring up immense controversy with this plastic surgery initiative.

However, even the top surgeons aren’t miracle workers. Ask any leading professional or top surgeon in his or her field, like Dr. Douglas Steinbrech.

“It is really about maturity, sensible possibilities and communication,” Steinbrech says. He will turn away individuals who request ridiculous procedures, like those highlighted on TV, and who bring in clearly altered social media photographs. He explains it is a sure sign of a much bigger problem.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Call Us - 646-949-0130
MENU
skyline